Gay Marriages Now Legal Countrywide in Mexico

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Updated: June 15, 2016

In Belize, there hasn’t been much drastic action taken in changing or amending the laws to suit the LGBT community.  As a matter of fact, outside of the social media rants and the attempt by UNIBAM’s Caleb Orozco to have a change in Section 53, there hasn’t been much lobbying for anything else.  But right next door to Belize, just across the Santa Elena border in the north, the country of Mexico has now legalized same sex marriages in all states. On May 17, 2016 Mexico’s President, Enrique Pena Nieto had signed onto an initiative to amend Article 4 of the Mexican Constitution which would legalize gay marriage in the entire country of Mexico and not only a few states as it stood then.  He had also submitted the Bill to make the appropriate changes in the civil code.  Earlier this month, Mexico’s highest court legalized same sex unions in a low-key move that not much people noticed.  The Mexico Supreme Court published an opinion known as a jurisprudential thesis, ruling that defining marriage as a union only between a man and a woman is discriminatory and in violation of Mexico’s constitution.  However, the Supreme Court decision did not go so far as to invalidate state laws as local city clerks can still refuse to grant a marriage license to same-sex couples.  The Catholic Church reportedly objected to the ruling, saying it goes against the basic family structure founded on the marriage of a man and a woman.  In the Latin America region, same-sex marriage has been advancing steadily with Argentina being the first to legalize it in 2010 followed by Brazil and Uruguay.  Other countries that have legalized gay marriage are Canada, France, The Netherlands, Portugal, South Africa, England and the United States.  Prior to legalizing gay marriage across Mexico, there were already a few states that were performing same sex marriages including Quintana Roo, Coahuila and the Federal District.