Chief Justice Rules Against Myrtle Palacio, Former PUP Sec Gen

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Updated: July 6, 2016

This afternoon just after two o’clock the case between Alfonso Noble, the Editor of The Guardian Newspaper and the former Secretary General for the PUP, Myrtle Palacio wrapped up in the courtroom of the Chief Justice, Kenneth Benjamin.  It is a story that began unravelling back in December 2014 when Palacio made some comments on the Vibes Radio Talk Show as they criticized the political process of the Bi-election for Cayo North.  Shortly after that talk show aired, the Guardian Newspaper published an article where it was suggested that Palacio endorses witchcraft in politics.  On the heels of that publication, a lawsuit commenced.  Love News spoke with Noble this evening on the outcome of the case.

ALFONSO NOBLE

“As you are aware Mrs.Palacio had taken the Guardian Newspaper and myself as the editor to court on a case of libel. She had claimed that I had libeled her. If my memory serves me it must have been in January 2014 the matter just concluded today with the chief justice saying that basically our position which we argued which was fair comment he upheld that submission and basically found that Mrs.Palacio’s case had no footing and dismissed the case. He awarded $5,000 in legal cost to the Guardian newspaper meaning that Mrs.Palacio will have to bear that burden for the matter.”

In addition to the publication, Palacio had also taken issue with a cartoon printed in the newspaper which one can only assume was about her.  When we asked Noble about it, here is how he responded.

ALFONSO NOBLE

“The picture?  How can you come up with that?  That is a cartoon. There is no way of pointing a cartoon on a person and if you know the history of politics in Belize you know that cartoons are a way of jesting at people and poking fun at people in political circles. Most people take it in stride. My suggestion to Mrs.Palacio is to grow some skin and toughen up; this is politics not church.”

As Noble mentioned, Palacio will have to pay The Guardian Newspaper five thousand dollars as was ruled by Chief Justice Kenneth Benjamin.