Guyana chooses the ICJ to Solve Border Problem

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Updated: November 15, 2017

Belize and Guyana are both former British colonies who have border disputes with their neighbours.  The unfounded Guatemalan claim over a portion of Belize has been well documented and it is expected that a referendum on the matter will take place.  Meanwhile, for Guyana, Venezuela is claiming over 40 percent of the country.  Love News spoke with the Honorary Consul of Guyana, Hugh Saul who explains.

Hugh Saul – Honorary Consul of Guyana

“It has escalated because of the discovery of oil but this controversy has been going on for quite some time and on each occasion we’ve used the good offices of the United Nations in an attempt to have the matter settled but recently as you know in June of 2015 there was the large discovery of oil in Guyana and because of that large discovery Venezuela has again is making attempts to lay claim to this area which on this occasion they are including the economic zone of Guyana which is that 200 mile sea coast that lies outside the coast of Guyana which would include the area where all this oil has actually been discovered.”

Venezuela is claiming two areas of Guyana which are the Essequibo region and the sea, where oil has been recently discovered.

Hugh Saul – Honorary Consul of Guyana

“The area that was claimed on land that was the area where you had a lot of gold deposits, gold and diamonds and rare earths and also manganese was discovered in very high quantities. High-quality oil it’s not the thick heavy oil that you find in Venezuela, this what is called the sweet crude that is found outside of the coast of Guyana and so this has caused Venezuela to raise its voice again.”

As we reported, Guatemala has set a new date to hold the referendum which will determine whether the matter will be taken to the International Court of Justice, while Belize has yet to set a date for its referendum. According to Guyana’s Honorary Consul, their government sees the ICJ as the ideal organization to solve their disagreement with Venezuela.

Hugh Saul – Honorary Consul of Guyana

“We see the ICJ as the logical course to follow because what that would do is provide a legal framework within which we can move on. At the present time because of this controversy people who are willing to come and invest in Guyana are having second thoughts and so it means that what is happening is that the development of Guyana is being stymied by the Venezuelan act but if we were to go to the ICJ our feeling is that once you have a legal decision made by the United Nations which is the highest authority globally that what that would do is put to rest this controversy and the recognition that whatever the decision is would become the borders within Guyana would exist and prosper.”

Guyana has over 86,000 square miles and Venezuela is claiming over 50,000 square miles.