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Technology

Creating code of conducts for social media use

JUDICIARY SOCIAL MEDIA

With the Judiciary system seeing the implementation of technology, the use of social media also comes into play. As Justice Peter Jamadar, Chairperson of CAJO, noted, they have added sites such as Twitter and Facebook for the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ).

With the Judiciary system seeing the implementation of technology, the use of social media also comes into play. As Justice Peter Jamadar, Chairperson of CAJO, noted, they have added sites such as Twitter and Facebook for the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ). According to Justice Jamadar, there needs to be a code of conduct established for judges when it comes to using social media.

Justice Peter Jamadar, Chairperson, CAJO: “Social media is with us and everybody is using social media and it has advantages. The CCJ has embraced the use of Twitter and Facebook and done so but in a controlled way meaning what it sends out to the public is looked at carefully by a unit, and therefore that’s a safe and constructive way of using social media. But one of the downsides of social media which we are struggling with and this is globally is if judges are for example saying something, a meme and they press a like suppose that could create a sense of bias because everything on social media is available to everybody in real time. So the use of social media has to come upon or be preceded by, I think, education; education in the wise use of social media especially by judicial officers because we have a responsibility to not use social media in a way that could undermine public trust and confidence. It’s a behavior thing because there are codes of conduct that regulate our behavior, what’s appropriate and what’s not appropriate,  and social media is just an extension of our public conduct albeit through social media, so it’s subject to the same ethical constraints and restraints.”

Justice Jamadar noted that social media can be a positive way to reach out to the wider public.

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