Deputy Prime Minister Cordel Hyde Addresses G-77 and China Summit

Deputy Prime Minister Cordel Hyde Addresses G-77 and China Summit

On Friday, we told you of the Deputy Prime Minister’s travel to Cuba for the G-77 and China Summit.  Today, the DPM, Cordel Hyde addressed the gathering of several nation leaders.  His near 9-minute address focused on several issues, including the contributions given to countries by Cuba, and the collaboration of the countries present.

Cordel Hyde, Deputy Prime Minister: “I come here bearing nothing but appreciation and thanks for the people and government of Cuba on behalf of the people and government of Belize. You were so very instrumental and absolutely indispensable in Belize’s long struggle for the right to self-determination and independence over 40 years ago. We would not have done it without you. Heads of government, ministers, ambassadors, and all other participants a very pleasant good evening and it’s an awesome evening when over a hundred members of the G77 plus China can gather and agree on a way forward that prioritizes the use of science and technology and innovation for our collective development. But for meaningful development to take place the existing international financial institutions and the developed world must reassess cruel and unfair classifications, give flesh to the world when it comes to pledges of grants and assistance for the developing world. Action must follow words. I mean, how much longer will we continue to see the damning and ominous effects of the climate crisis before the developed countries act with alacrity and decisiveness and steal a purpose that’s required when our very existence is on the threat. I mean, it’s not… like they don’t notice. They notice, they speak this, but they don’t do this. It is clear that we, the leaders of the developing countries, often understand the issues, crave the solutions, know the best practices, but individually many times we are not able to afford those solutions. This topic is not new to us. The framework for the application of science, technology, and innovation already exists via the Paris Agreement and the Global Digital Compact. Much has been accomplished through UNESCO, UNCAC, UNIDO, and others too numerous to name and we know more can be achieved with efficacy.”

Minister Hyde also spoke on the current embargo placed on Cuba by the United States.  He called for the lifting of the restrictions so they can be a part of global development.

Cordel Hyde, Deputy Prime Minister: “The question is, what will we do about this continued designation of Cuba as a state sponsor of terrorism and the eternal embargo imposed on the people of Cuba? The nefarious blockade against the people of Cuba or went affront to the humanitarian assistance offered across the world by this one small country. We’ve heard what Menzel Mandela wrote, Cuba deserves to be glorified and to be allowed to exercise its sovereignty, even the space to breathe to continue to practice its genius that it has so willingly and magnanimously shared with the world. The world has seen a difference between the beautiful growth and development of a Cuba with somewhat relaxed measures and the present one overburdened with increasingly hardened and vile measures designed to inflict total pain and suffering on 11 million of the world’s finest people. The losses in revenue are estimated to be in the billions. The losses caused by shortened lives and dramatically and declining quality of life are incalculable. The embargo and wicked designation of state sponsor of terrorism must end.”

Another topic that Minister Hyde spoke on was the high cost of living, and economic pressures being faced by the world.

Cordel Hyde, Deputy Prime Minister:  “The skyrocketing cost of living mixed with crushing poverty, mixed with perennial low and no income has been a deadly cocktail for our collective people of the South. It’s like we’re a downhill march to perdition. It’s like the end is nigh and we can’t really do anything about it. And I don’t believe that. We can, but we must do it together. And that is why the summit is all the more heartwarming and encouraging. We must do it together, not separately. Together. I grudgingly concede that we must put on record our demand for greater representation in global decision making. The need to close the gender digital divide. The need for the fulfillment of pledge assistance for the development of the South. And the need to confront the brain drain of our specialized human resources. Although we know that historically, they have not heeded these calls. But we put on record because it’s the right thing to do. And the leaders of the North say they’re about the right things but perhaps they may surprise us and oblige us this time, this one time. But if they don’t, and they probably won’t, we have ourselves, all 134 of us. And we have the awesome, brilliant example of Cuba, who has risen to miraculous heights in science and technology and biotechnology despite the wickedly cruel blockade and the classification of the state that sponsors terrorism. It’s indicative of what we can do, what we can be, if we harness all we have together. Imagine if we join all the brilliant energies and genius in our midst and galvanize us as one and try to bring ourselves up together and not wait on anyone else to do it for us. We do it for ourselves.”

With both the Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Minister out on business, Minister Francis Fonseca is acting as Prime Minister.

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